Jody Whitesides & TELEFUNKEN “Thump, Thump, Thump”

Classic C-12 Sound for Vocals and Acoustic Guitar

South Windsor, CT, May 2017 — Popular producer and recording artist Jody Whitesides has released his new single, “Thump, Thump, Thump” which features catchy speed changes via tempo mapping combined with vocals and acoustic guitar recorded with his TELEFUNKEN C12 mic, a faithful recreation of the classic Austrian large diaphragm microphone.

“The C12 not only has that legendary sound, but it’s also a very versatile mic for all kinds of vocal styles and instrumentation,” says Whitesides, who also used the mic for his opening TV Theme for “Nightwatch” on A&E. “The C12 creates a very distinctive moody sound for the acoustic guitars sitting deep in the mix of the theme.”

“Thump, Thump, Thump” took shape in four different studio environments, with contributions from studio pros Erez Gnat (drummer, Hilary Duff) and Jesse Stern (bassist, Jordin Sparks). Whitesides and co-producer George Leger III evoked the

heartbeat sound by mixing the sounds of actual human blood circulation with actual hammers hitting wood and metal. “Thump, Thump, Thump” is comprised of more than 100 tracks of audio for a rich, high-fidelity sound that is reminiscent of the sumptuous productions of 1980s Top 40.

jodywhitesides.com/

After his studies at Boston’s Berklee College of Music and at LA’s Musicians Institute, Whitesides worked his way around the country until he settled on Los Angeles as home, where he has produced Throwing Toasters, Seth Horan, and others in his private studio. He started his solo career with E.A.R. (Energy Audio Revolution) for On Records in 2000. Since then he’s released several CDs (is this considered naked, Initial Spank, A Natural Leap Forward, Practical Insanity). When Whitesides isn’t on the road, he also finds time to create music for video games and is the music supervisor for The Radio Adventures of Dr. Floyd podcast.

Originally developed by AKG Acoustics in 1953, the C12 is revered for its smooth, airy frequency response. The design of the C12 was unique in its remote capsule polarizing technology. The ability to change the capsule’s polar response variably between cardioid, omnidirectional and figure-8 (and six intermediate patterns between) from the power supply instead of with switches on board the microphone made the C12 the most versatile large diaphragm tube microphone of its time. Considered by many to be the finest sounding microphone ever produced, original C12 microphones are still in use in recording studios throughout the world.